When not to use alternative dispute resolution

Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) works best when people in dispute are prepared to adopt a co-operative approach to problem-solving. Where one or both people are not prepared to do this, ADR may not be the best option. Similarly, if one person is fearful of the other or for some other reason is unable to freely put forward their needs and interests then, depending on the process being considered, ADR may not be their best alternative. Your ADR practitioner will usually have a preliminary meeting with you to determine whether or not ADR is appropriate, and you can raise any concerns that you may have then.

When not to use alternative dispute resolution  :  Last Revised: Thu Jul 31st 2014
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