Registering a birth

How is a birth registered?

A birth registration statement must be lodged with the Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages ('the Registrar') within 60 days of the child's birth.The maximum penalty for not doing so is $1 250.

See Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act 1996 (SA) s 16(1).

What if a birth is registered late?

A birth can still be registered outside the 60 day period and the Registrar must accept a birth registration statement even if lodged outside of this period.

See Birth, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act 1996 s 16(2).

Who is responsible for registering a birth?

Both parents are jointly responsible for registering the birth of their child and both must sign the birth registration statement. However, the Registrar may accept a statement signed by only one parent if satisfied it is impossible, impracticable or inappropriate for the other parent to sign whether because of death, disappearance, ill health, unavailability or the need to avoid unwarranted distress.

If only one parent signs the birth registration statement, he or she must attach an explanation of why the other parent has not signed. The Registrar has the authority to make further enquiries if not satisfied with the explanation given.

See Birth, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act 1996 s 15.

Information to be included in the birth registration statement

The following information must be provided in the birth registration statement [see Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Regulations 2011 Reg 5]:

  • the period of gestation of the child (in weeks) and whether the child was born alive;
  • the date and place of birth;
  • the child’s sex;
  • the child’s weight at birth (in grams);
  • the child’s name (this can be provided for a still-born child but it is not mandatory in such cases);
  • if the child was the product of a multiple birth, the total number of children born and the place in the order of birth of the child;
  • the name of the child’s mother and, if it is different to her current name, the mother’s name at birth (or on adoption);
  • the date of birth, place of birth, occupation and residential address of the child’s mother;
  • the name of the child’s father;
  • the date of birth, place of birth, occupation and residential address of the child’s father;
  • if the child’s mother and father are married – the date and place of the marriage;
  • the name, sex and date of birth of each previous child of the child’s mother and father;
  • the sex and date of birth of each previous child of the child's mother and a person other than the child's father;
  • whether the child’s mother and father are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent (or both);
  • the name and business address of the doctor or midwife responsible for the professional care of the mother at the birth.

In the case of children conceived as a result of a fertilisation procedure:

  • the name (if known) of the biological parent who donated the semen or ovum resulting in the child’s birth (the donor); and
  • the sex (if known) of the donor; and
  • the donor’s date of birth and place of birth (if known).

This information is also to be recorded in the Register [reg 6].

Can details of parentage be altered after the birth has been registered?

There are provisions to allow alterations about a child's parentage under the following circumstances:

  • where the father and mother of the child make a joint application for the addition of the information; or
  • one parent of the child makes an application for the addition of the information and the other parent cannot join in the application because he or she is dead or cannot be found, or for some other reason; or
  • if a court directs the inclusion or correction of information in the Register; or
  • the Registrar is advised of a finding by a court that a particular person is a parent of the child.

See Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act 1996 s 18.

Must the birth registration include the name of the child?

Yes, the birth registration statement must include the name of the child. Although the name is a matter of choice for the parents lodging the statement, the Registrar can assign a name to a child if the name stated in the birth registration statement is a prohibited name or the birth registration is lodged by both parents and they satisfy the Registrar that they are unable to agree on the child's name.

See Births, Deaths and Marriages Registration Act 1996 s 21. 

What happens if there is a dispute about the child's name?

In the event of a dispute between parents as to the child's name either parent may apply to the Magistrates Court for orders resolving the dispute. For more information, see 'Changing a child's name'.

Registering a birth  :  Last Revised: Fri Mar 24th 2017
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