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Community Service Orders

A debtor can either undertake community service through an agreed arrangement with the Fines Enforcement and Recovery Unit in relation to offsetting a debt, or pursuant to a court order issued as part of enforcement proceedings for a debt.

Community Service as an agreement with the Fines Enforcement and Recovery Unit

Community service agreements will only be made at the pre-enforcement stage (i.e. by agreement with the Chief Recovery Officer) where the Chief Recovery Officer is satisfied that the debtor does not have, and it not likely to have within a reasonable amount of time, the means of paying the debt without them or their dependants suffering hardship [Fines Enforcement and Debt Recovery Act 2017 (SA) s 15(6)].

The number of hours of community service to be completed by the debtor equates to 7.5 hours for every $200 owing [see Fines Enforcement and Debt Recovery Act 2017 (SA) s 15(12); Fines Enforcement and Debt Recovery Regulations 2018 (SA) reg 8(1)(a)].

If, at any time, the Chief Recovery Officer is satisfied that a debtor subject to a community service agreement has the means to pay the fine without them or their dependants suffering hardship, they may terminate the agreement by notice in writing to the debtor [see Fines Enforcement and Debt Recovery Act 2017 (SA) s 15(10)].

At the pre-enforcement stage, the Chief Recovery Officer has ability to enter into, vary and revoke a community service agreement without any need to apply to the court.

Community Service as an Enforcement Action

In the event that enforcement action in relation to a debt has failed, or other enforcement options are unavailable or inappropriate, or where the Chief Recovery Officer refuses to enter into such an agreement, an application can be made to the court for a community service order. The court can order that community service be performed where it is satisfied that the debtor does not have, and is not likely to have in a reasonable amount of time, the means to satisfy the amount owing without them or their dependants suffering hardship [s 46(1)].The amount of community service the court can order should equate to 7.5 hours for each prescribed unit of monetary amount owing [s 46(3)]. If a court ordered community service order is made, the debtor cannot leave the State without the permission of the court [see s 46(3)(b)].

If a debtor does not comply with a court-ordered community service order, then a term of imprisonment can be imposed in default of compliance. Such a term will be calculated on the basis of 1 days imprisonment for each 7.5 hours of community service remaining to be performed, or 12 months, whichever is less [s 47(2)].

Community Service Orders  :  Last Revised: Fri May 4th 2018
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